Re-imagining beta testing in the ever-changing world of automation (Article at Opensource.com)

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Check the article at :  https://opensource.com/article/18/1/beta-testing-automation

Today’s beta test solutions aren’t working to develop products that meet users’ needs. It’s time for a new vision.

If you ask most people why beta testing and related tools are important, they’ll name things such as shortening of beta cycles, reduced time investment, increased tester participation, improved feedback loops and visibility. However, all the reasons why beta testing is so critical can be narrowed down to two major issues, both of which are predominant in the beta testing phase of the SDLC:

  1. The intersection of humans and technology
  2. Usability and quality standards

Read complete article here: https://opensource.com/article/18/1/beta-testing-automation

 

 

 

 

 

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Omnipresent Operating System (OS) : Re-imagining the Next Killer Experience for future of OS.

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Reincarnation in the Hinduism is one of the fascinating philosophical concepts that says that a soul or spirit after meeting a biological death is capable of leading a new life in a new body. Being a Hindu, I also believe in the transfer of one’s soul after death into another body which produces a continuous cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth through one’s many lifetimes in Samsara.

Though this is an analogy from the mythologies and scriptures in Hinduism and other religious books, the concept of the same soul is passing through different bodies is somewhat can inspire the experience for the next-gen Operating System (OS) — an ecosystem where the OS is “omnipresent” as a soul and allows the user to move through different “systems” and “devices”(even we can extend this to IoT contexts!) .

A user story might record this user’s perspective something as —

“I should be able to use my application uninterruptedly and seamlessly across various devices/system as I move through different devices due to certain needs”.

It is like soul transfer — transferring consciousness from one body to another body.  In the movie The Matrix(1999), the Agents were transferring themselves to different person’s bodies. One interesting thing to note here is that being transferred to a new body they remember their goals, their memory etc.

(Fig: In the movie, The Matrix (1999), the agents can transfer themselves into other bodies at will.)

The idea that I termed as Omnipresent Operating System is to share application sessions (along with all the state/session data etc.) from one system to another system that allows to continue the application running on the later system in exactly in the same state and using the same session without the user to start the application from beginning or using a different application session in the later system to use all the benefits of available in the later system. This helps to achieve unifiedseamless & omnipresence-experience across different systems.

Use-Cases:

Following are five use-cases represented in images :

In each one, we can see a daily life usage where the experience for the user are extremely simplified through the proposed solution.

Historically the OS concept has progressed over time through many evolutions. Typically the OS is defined as a system of software which manages the hardware resources of the system to provide a base for its users’ programmatic computing needs. Throughout the history, multiple dimensions were addressed for operating systems such as performance, multitasking, usability, portability, mobility etc. We are witnessing a period of time when the transformation is happening to the evolution of OS at the highest rate possible. This is due to diversification of software technology, hardware, and evolution in new age eco-systems and new paradigms of digital devices. This is an age when we are witnessing the coming of IoT (i.e. Internet of Things) and cloud, where any device can be part of a bigger eco-system and be an extension of a cloud system.

So the question is what is the future of Operating system? Is it that cloud will be the ultimate operating system? At least by looking at the Chrome book, defining a thin-client based access to all the computational needs that stay in the cloud”. But still, the diversification of operating systems prompt us to pause and think, something is missing. The missing piece is convergence.

We have many derivatives of different types of OS. Android, iOS, Linux, Windows and OSX are to name the few of the variations, that continue the OS war. But users are limited by this. Imagining an application running in one OS . Can we use the same application in another one? No. Also imagine a situation, when you are reading an email and want to update it (the same email )on your PC…can you do it? No.

If we see the trends today towards the future, it’s all about micro-services and server-less architecture similar to torrent (peer-to-peer) or blockchain implementation, de-centralized and distributed eco-systems where the systems communicate to each other. In such scenarios, the next killer experience is to have the ability of the omnipresence across this distributed & de-centralized eco-systems.

Solution Implementation:

The solution can be implemented in two ways. To illustrate this assuming that there are two devices and the user initially starts using some application in the first one and then he moves to the second device and uses the same session and input data in the second device .

Approach 1. Both the devices (i.e. Device 1 & Device 2) will be running same Omni-present Operating System ( in real life scenarios it might be possible in some cases that they can be of different versions of the same OS ) which will have capabilities to transfer the application & user data including session/environment variables etc.. along with necessary components that will allow to render that in another device.

Approach 2. Both the devices may not run the same Omnipresent Operating System… they may be running 2 different OS (including 3rd party OS like Android and Windows etc.) .. in such cases both the device can have some Run-time Component installed to allow them to have the capabilities to transfer the application & user data including session/environment variables etc.. along with necessary components that will allow rendering that on the device on receipt of such data .

The following diagram illustrates the different fundamental components are to be placed in an architecture of the eco-system in order to make it work.

Description of the diagram :

100 and 200 are two devices connected over the same network via wifi/Lan/Bluetooth etc. (e.g. 150 & 250). 
110 is an application running in 100. 120 is the Runtime Component that helps to achieve the desired outcome proposed in the invention (might be part of the OS). 
100 is connected to internet via port 140. 
111 is the session data, 112 is user authentication and related data, 113 is environment related data (e.g. browser version, OS version, history, some system variable etc. ), 114 is any other metadata that might be associated with any of the components of the environment. 
115 is the application data (e.g. client session, user input data, cookies, local storage, application related variables etc. ). 
210 is an equivalent application running in 200.  
220 is the Runtime Component that helps to achieve the desired outcome proposed in the invention (might be part of the OS). 
200 is connected to the internet via port 240. 150 is a means of connection (e.g. wifi, LAN, Bluetooth, NFC, IR etc. ) of 100 with any other devices like in this case 200. 
250 is the similar means of connection. 
Both 100 and 200 are connected to each other - for which may 100 might be using any other port 130 and same for 200 where it might be using 230. 
Now when the user runs device 100 and runs application 110, his data related to that state is collected and transferred to the other device 200 over the connection. This transfer is depicted as 160. 
This data is stored by the runtime 220 as 111, 112, 113, 114, 115. 

Now runtime selects the compatible application 210 which may have it's own session 211 and other related data. 
Now runtime 220 uses 111, 112, 113, 114, 115 to determine what can be populated in 210 , which may include the text or any info the user had entered in device 100 and this allows to run the application 210 with the user's data. 
Now the user uses device 200 to continue using editing or working on his data using app 210 and once he finishes, runtime 220 collects the modified data from the app 210 and sends it back to device 100 , depicted in 260 so that in 100 the runtime 120 uses that to populate the app 110 and within the same session as 111 and if the need is to update some server over the internet, it can do so via using the same session and thread via the same network port as 140. 

Note : The above example shows only a generic approach and describes the overall components. Depending on the scenario the usage might vary slightly -- for example if the user does not need to use same session and the port to connect to server, the flow might be different where once the user has updated his info in 210 on device 200, instead of sending back the updated data to device 100 as depicted in 260, the 220 runtimes can submit it to server or backend using 240 over a different session.

Note: The above example shows only a generic approach and describes the overall components. Depending on the scenario the usage might vary slightly — for example if the user does not need to use the same session and the port to connect to server, the flow might be different where once the user has updated his info in 210 on device 200, instead of sending back the updated data to device 100 as depicted in 260, the 220 runtimes can submit it to server or backend using 240 over a different session.

Why is Omnipresence is the future for OS?

Interestingly, when Cloud OS concept came into existence, the driving force behind it was the thoayeught that a ‘good’ OS gets out of the way and lets the user get straight to what they want. In Microsoft’s approach – From the perspective of the user, they’re no longer using a program on a machine but consuming a service that lives in an arbitrary place. Because the service runs on an API common to all machines, it becomes easier to scale and failover. This is concept the drives Platform as a Service (Azure’s tour de force). [Source]

Big players like Microsoft also believe that the “perfect future [of OS] would mean that […] software is totally portable between desktop and mobile devices. “. The kind of attempts by such players are to converge the OS of mobile as well Desktops.

Though many attempted in the past to evaluate thin-client OS as the future (e.g. http://www.totalnetworx.com/computers-technology/google-chrome-os-operating-system-future/ ), also gradually started to foresee the future of OS as something that can not be seen in the light of only a server-client architecture rather it would be defined in something more organic that would be sustainable. Articles like Desktop 2.0 and the future of the networked operating system , interestingly long back predicted the conclusion that we are carrying forward today that the Chrome OS version of the future where all we need is a browser is wrong.

So how Omni-present OS concept is different than thin-client and (even some old geeks referring the Mainframes to get the secret-sauce for the future!)? Here are the basic differentiators:

The Begining:

As I mentioned, in today’s OS evolution, it is the diversification of operating systems that prompt us to pause and think about the missing bridge to the future. If we closely ponder, it appears that the missing piece is convergence. The Omnipresent OS concept is a thought towards that direction. It’s actually a beginning for us to be prepared for tomorrow’s decentralized networked world where the age-old philosophies will show us the way!

(c) 2017-18 Samir Dash, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/omnipresent-operating-system-os-re-imagining-next-killer-samir-dash

 

Beta Testing in the Ever-Changing World of Automation

Beta testing is fundamentally all about the testing of a product performed by real users in a real environment…Beta testing relies on the popular belief that goodness will prevail, which defines the typical tools that carry out such tests. Examples are the shortening of beta cycles, reducing the time investment, increasing tester participation, improving the feedback loop and visibility, etc…we lack “smartness” and proper “automation” in Beta Testing Solutions…

Check out the complete article at RedHat Developers Blog:

https://developers.redhat.com/blog/2018/01/05/beta-testing-automation/